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HOME : Classical Antiquities : Archive : Apulian Red-Figure Bell Krater
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Apulian Red-Figure Bell Krater - PF.6232
Origin: Magna Graecia
Circa: 330 BC to 300 BC
Dimensions: 9.25" (23.5cm) high
Collection: Classical
Style: Apulian
Medium: Terracotta


Additional Information: SOLD

Location: United States
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Description
The Greek colonies of southern Italy (known in antiquity as Magna Graecia) were marked by their initial allegiance to the ceramic styles of the Attic mainland. However, over the years, native traditions and innovations heavily influenced the works of Magna Graecian potters. Unorthodox forms and painting-styles were seamlessly merged with the standard Greek style, creating distinctive works of art unique to the Hellenistic world. The painting that decorates this vessel is characteristic of the Apulian style. One half of the body depicts a winged goddess, naked, sitting upon a rocky outcropping. She holds a plate in the air from which a branch emerges. Perhaps this is a libation she has just been offered. The other side of the krater features a representation of a woman’s face. Her curly hair has been tied back into a bun and covered with a cloth. She holds an orange object up to her face and appears as if she is taking a deep whiff of its fragrant odor. Maybe she is just about to bite into this sweet fruit. A reserve band with a painted meander motif frames the bottom of the scenes while a band of chevrons decorates the upper rim just below the lip. The gentle curves of the vessel are remarkable. The slight swelling of the body, the smooth tapering of the rim and foot all show that this vessel was potted by an expert. Apulian works of art were widely collected throughout the Classical world, even rivaling the popularity of Attic vessels. We gazing upon this fanciful work of art, it is easy to understand why this distinctive style of work was so popular in antiquity and remains so with collectors today. - (PF.6232)

 

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