Barakat Gallery
Login | Register | User Services | Search | Newsletter Sign-up
Barakat Gallery
HOME : Near Eastern Art : Archive : Neolithic Tel Halaf Terracotta Fertility Idol
Click to view original image.
Neolithic Tel Halaf Terracotta Fertility Idol - X.0558
Origin: Asia Minor
Circa: 5000 BC to 4000 BC
Dimensions: 2.75" (7.0cm) high x 1.75" (4.4cm) wide x 2" (5.1cm) depth
Collection: Near Eastern
Medium: Terracotta


Additional Information: Sold

Location: United States
Ask a Question
Email to a Friend
Previous Item
Next Item
Photo Gallery
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Description
Tel Halaf is an ancient Mesopotamian archaeological site situated at the headwaters of the Khabur River in northeastern Syria. Here, the remains of a long lost Neolithic culture were uncovered by a group of German archaeologists between the years of 1899 and 1927. The artifacts unearthed included pottery painted with geometric designs and animal motifs as well as terracotta figures. These finds indicated that this site was once a thriving city during the 5th millennium B.C. The city was recorded as a tributary city-state of Gozan by the Assyrian king Adad-nirari II, suggesting that this ancient city remained an important center for well over three thousand years.

The small terracotta figurines unearthed at Tel Halaf are believed to represent one of the earliest representations of the Near Eastern “mother goddess.” While she was known by many names to many ancient cultures, Astarte, Ashtarut, Ishtar, the ancient mother goddess was one of the most important deities of the ancient world who was universally worshipped throughout the lands of the Near East for her fertility powers. Her fecundity has been clearly represented in her swollen breasts and exaggerated, heavy thighs. Painted details are used to indicate facial features as well as jewelry or tattooing. Such a woman would have represented the pinnacle of female perfection to a society that’s primary concern was agriculture and procreation. A figure such as this, when utilized in a ritual context, would have been able to provide the faithful with bountiful harvest, both in the fields and in the womb. - (X.0558)

 

Home About Us Help Contact Us Services Publications Search
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Security

Copyright (c) 2000-2019 by Barakat, Inc. All Rights Reserved

contact-form@barakatgallery.com - TEL 310.859.8408 - FAX 310.276.1346

coldfusion hosting