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HOME : Coin Jewelry : Coin Necklaces : Greek Silver Coin Of Calabria/ Tarentum
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Greek Silver Coin Of Calabria/ Tarentum - DK.090
Origin: Europe
Circa: 290 BC to 280 BC

Collection: Coin Jewelry
Medium: Gold
Condition: Extra Fine


Location: United States
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Description
Obverse: Taras astride a dolphin, extending right arm, and holding distaff in left. Reverse: Nude Ephebus on horse back, rearing right, spearing downward with right hand. Taras (???a?) was, according to Greek mythology, the son of Poseidon and of the nymph Satyrion. Taras is the eponymous founder of the Greek colony of Taras (Tarentum, modern Taranto), in Magna Graecia. Note that a harbour close by Taranto is still called Torre Saturo (derived from Satyrion). It was in Torre Saturo, almost 15 km south of Taranto, that Spartan colonists settled their first colony in Taranto zone. Later, around 706 BC, they conquered the Iapygian city of Taranto. On the coinage of the ancient city of Taras, the son of Poisedon is depicted on a dolphin, sometimes with his father's trident in one hand; the same image is depicted on the modern city emblem. in ancient Greece, any male who had attained the age of puberty. In Athens it acquired a technical sense, referring to young men aged 18–20. From about 335 bc they underwent two years of military training under the supervision of an elected kosmetes and 10 sophronistai (“chasteners”). At the end of the first year each ephebus received a sword and shield from the state; probably at this stage he took the ephebic oath. During their service, ephebi were exempt from civic duties and deprived of most civic rights. During the 3rd century bc, ephebic service ceased to be compulsory and the duration was reduced to one year. The ephebia became an institution for the wealthy classes only. By the 1st century bc foreigners were admitted, and the curriculum was expanded to include philosophic and literary studies, although the military character of the ephebia was not wholly lost. The system began to decay late in the 3rd century ad. In other Hellenistic cities the term ephebi was applied to youths aged 15–17. - (DK.090)

 

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