Barakat Gallery
Login | Register | User Services | Search | Newsletter Sign-up
Barakat Gallery
HOME : African & Tribal Art : Archive : Dogon Sculpture of a Seated Female
Click to view original image.
Dogon Sculpture of a Seated Female - PF.5883
Origin: Mali
Circa: 20 th Century AD
Dimensions: 11.375" (28.9cm) high x 2.5" (6.4cm) wide
Collection: African
Style: Dogon
Medium: Wood


Additional Information: Sold

Location: United States
Ask a Question
Email to a Friend
Previous Item
Next Item
Photo Gallery
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Click photo to change image.
Print image
Description
The forms and style of this statue are based upon a similar composition representing mythical beings deriving from the Bombu-Toro subgroup of the Dogon peoples. These mythical beings symbolize the human ideal. For women, this ideal is fertility, conveyed by her large breasts and the calabash she holds in her hands. This large spoon with a long handle is the women’s insignia used to accompany the songs in certain Dogon rituals. This woman is seated in a chiefly position upon a stool that, in similar prototypes, are carved in the image of the world. The two discs, the lower symbolizing earth and the upper heaven, are generally connected by a central axis, that in this case is lacking. The two discs are connected by four caryatid figures. The upper disc, however, can seat no person no matter how powerful. If you look closely, you will see that the thighs and buttocks of the seated female do not actually touch the disc but are instead slightly elevated. Thus this divine being, who rests above the heavenly disc, is clearly separated from the human caryatids who reside in the realm between earth and heaven. The figures facial features, especially the almond-shaped eyes, coiffure, and decorative scarifications are influenced by similar examples of Dogon art. The female’s beard can be explained by the fact that several of these types of figures represent both female and male attributes, amd thus are truly representative of the human ideal. Overall, this sculpture hints at the symbolic power and prestige that permeates African art. - (PF.5883)

 

Home About Us Help Contact Us Services Publications Search
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Security

Copyright (c) 2000-2018 by Barakat, Inc. All Rights Reserved

contact-form@barakatgallery.com - TEL 310.859.8408 - FAX 310.276.1346

coldfusion hosting