Barakat Gallery
Login | Register | User Services | Search | Newsletter Sign-up
Barakat Gallery
HOME : Islamic Art : AS Collection 4 : Unglazed Filter Jug
Click to view original image.
Unglazed Filter Jug - LO.1302
Origin: Jericho
Circa: 11th th Century AD to 12th th Century AD
Dimensions: 7.5" (19.1cm) high x 7.8" (19.8cm) wide
Collection: Islamic Art
Medium: Terracotta


Additional Information: AS

Location: Great Britain
Purchase
Currency Converter
Place On Hold
Ask a Question
Email to a Friend
Previous Item
Next Item
Description
“The water of Jericho is held to be the highest and best in all of Islam” Al Maqdisi, ACE 985 Unglazed, whitish earthenware jug with cast and tooled decoration; piriform body, formed of two mould-made halves, the seam carefully rubbed down; conical spout with filter and applied handle; Kufic inscription to shoulder; foliate scroll and animal procession to upper body, ridges and wavy lines to groundline. This piece heralds from the banks of the Jordan River in Palestine. At the time the jug was in use, proffering a cool sip of water amid the desert heat and shady palms of Jericho, the Abbasid dynasty (ACE 750-1258) was at the helm of an unwieldy empire that stretched from Spain to the borders of India, through Persia and the Middle East and along the coast of North Africa. Great power transfers defined the political vista and the empire was divided between several powerful states. Each operated within a distinct matrix of political affiliation, devotional expression and cultural identity, which transpired to great diversity in art and the development of regional vocabularies shaped by both Islamic and pre-Islamic influences. Yet, resisting the tendency for continual change, this piece is a delightful testament to the continuity of a longstanding praxis in Palestine that endures and remains unchanged for millennia. Whitish, unglazed wares see little change in material, form and function over centuries. Simple technology for simple function. Most likely used to cool or even flavour water. We often find these vessels richly adorned with motifs that present both aesthetic and metaphoric qualities. While highly decorative in itself, the rich animal imagery encircling the upper body connotes the hunt and besides, the princely life – a popular theme in art. The influence of Persian metalwork - transmitted to Islam following the fall of Sassanian Empire in ACE 651 - on the Islamic ceramic industry is manifest at this time. Rather than ignoring the culture of the peoples they came into contact with, artisans appropriated certain elements and used them to enrich existing forms and techniques. Owing to an emphasis placed on writing in the Qu’ran and use of Arabic in the Holy Scriptures, inscriptions have always had a prominent place in the culture of Islam and feature extensively on everyday items. Utilitarian items also enjoyed an exalted resonance in Islamic culture as they represented the focal point of hospitality. 8th and 9th century poems (by Musawir al Warraq and Ibn Qutayba respectively) reveal an early link between vessels and poetry. Ibn Qutayba wrote extensively on the subject of gastronomy and devoted poems to cooking-pots, serving dishes and bowls. These poems may well illuminate the impetus behind inscribing ceramic wares with verses. The combination of both the animate and inanimate has a powerful voice here that enunciates the potter’s response to the spread of new technologies throughout the empire and attempt to reconcile both old and new traditions while abiding by the rather austere artistic strictures of Islam. The sturdy handle tells us the jug was intended to be used. cf. Ceramics From Islamic Lands, Kuwait National Museum, The Al-Sabah Collection, Oliver Watson (Thames & Hudson, 2004), P.115 for similar. L01302 UNGLAZED FILTER JUG, JERICHO, ACE 800- 1200. “The water of Jericho is held to be the highest and best in all of Islam” Al Maqdisi, ACE 985 Unglazed, whitish earthenware jug with cast and tooled decoration; piriform body, formed of two mould-made halves, the seam carefully rubbed down; conical spout with filter and applied handle; Kufic inscription to shoulder; foliate scroll and animal procession to upper body, ridges and wavy lines to groundline. This piece heralds from the banks of the Jordan River in Palestine. At the time the jug was in use, proffering a cool sip of water amid the desert heat and shady palms of Jericho, the Abbasid dynasty (ACE 750-1258) was at the helm of an unwieldy empire that stretched from Spain to the borders of India, through Persia and the Middle East and along the coast of North Africa. Great power transfers defined the political vista and the empire was divided between several powerful states. Each operated within a distinct matrix of political affiliation, devotional expression and cultural identity, which transpired to great diversity in art and the development of regional vocabularies shaped by both Islamic and pre-Islamic influences. Yet, resisting the tendency for continual change, this piece is a delightful testament to the continuity of a longstanding praxis in Palestine that endures and remains unchanged for millennia. Whitish, unglazed wares see little change in material, form and function over centuries. Simple technology for simple function. Most likely used to cool or even flavour water. We often find these vessels richly adorned with motifs that present both aesthetic and metaphoric qualities. While highly decorative in itself, the rich animal imagery encircling the upper body connotes the hunt and besides, the princely life – a popular theme in art. The influence of Persian metalwork - transmitted to Islam following the fall of Sassanian Empire in ACE 651 - on the Islamic ceramic industry is manifest at this time. Rather than ignoring the culture of the peoples they came into contact with, artisans appropriated certain elements and used them to enrich existing forms and techniques. Owing to an emphasis placed on writing in the Qu’ran and use of Arabic in the Holy Scriptures, inscriptions have always had a prominent place in the culture of Islam and feature extensively on everyday items. Utilitarian items also enjoyed an exalted resonance in Islamic culture as they represented the focal point of hospitality. 8th and 9th century poems (by Musawir al Warraq and Ibn Qutayba respectively) reveal an early link between vessels and poetry. Ibn Qutayba wrote extensively on the subject of gastronomy and devoted poems to cooking-pots, serving dishes and bowls. These poems may well illuminate the impetus behind inscribing ceramic wares with verses. The combination of both the animate and inanimate has a powerful voice here that enunciates the potter’s response to the spread of new technologies throughout the empire and attempt to reconcile both old and new traditions while abiding by the rather austere artistic strictures of Islam. The sturdy handle tells us the jug was intended to be used. cf. Ceramics From Islamic Lands, Kuwait National Museum, The Al-Sabah Collection, Oliver Watson (Thames & Hudson, 2004), P.115 for similar. Prof. Geza Fehervari Prof. Geoffrey King - (LO.1302)

 

Home About Us Help Contact Us Services Publications Search
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Security

Copyright (c) 2000-2020 by Barakat, Inc. All Rights Reserved

contact-form@barakatgallery.com - TEL 310.859.8408 - FAX 310.276.1346

coldfusion hosting